Articles Posted in Injury Cases

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We all give advice. Whether you are a lawyer, teacher, parent, doctor, plumber, etc..,  at some point, someone is going to ask for your advice. But here is the thing about the advice you seek:  you do not know how good it is until you do the exact opposite.[1]

Why do people not follow advice?  Well, some folks do not really want advice.  They want permission.  They are only asking as a way of confirming what they wanted to do in the first place.  The other main reason people do not follow advice is because it is not easy.  Having the discipline to do what you know you should do can be hard i.e., exercising, saving for retirement, studying for exams, etc.   So, we thought we would give you some important legal advice that is easy to follow and, trust us, you won’t know how good it is unless you don’t follow it. Continue reading

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Memorial Day weekend is upon us, which also means boating season is about to be in full swing.  For those of you who plan to hit the lakes and rivers this summer, read on for a reminder about important safety rules as well as a new law covering wake boarders and wake surfers. Continue reading

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If you have Googled “How to Win an Accident Case” or “How Much Can I Sue for in an Accident Case” or “How to File an Accident Lawsuit” or anything similar to these types of searches, please proceed with extreme caution.  If you were in an accident with very minor, fully resolved injuries (like your neck was a little sore for a couple of days and without any medical intervention it completely improved), you do not need a lawyer.  But anything beyond that, you really should, at a minimum, consult an injury lawyer.  Now let us tell you why. Continue reading

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In 2020, which is the most recent, reported data, 932 people lost their lives in bicycle accidents in this country, an almost 9% increase over the prior year.  To be sure, biking has enjoyed an increase in popularity due to environmental concerns, economic issues (bikes are cheaper to own and maintain than a car), the health benefits, and electric bikes help with challenging hills and longer commutes.  But even with better urban planning and an increased availability of dedicated bike lanes, the fact remains that the number one cause of biking fatalities is collisions with motor vehicles.  In 2021, 321 bicyclists were killed on Tennessee roadways.  Read on to learn how you can help lower that number for 2022. Continue reading

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The reality is that, by this point, everyone knows you should not drive distracted.  So maybe it is not more awareness we need, but more action.  But just like losing 10 lbs. or learning a new language, it can be difficult for some people to find the discipline to actually stop driving while distracted.  In fact, Americans seem to be doing worse instead of better.  Recent studies show distracted driving has actually increased nearly 30% since the start of the pandemic.  So what can you do? Continue reading

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Since the pandemic began, pet adoptions have soared.  Roughly 23 million Americans have adopted a pet since this whole mess started.  And while that is great news for the animals, it has led to a rising increase in the number of unleashed dogs in neighborhoods.  Quite simply, many pet owners became used to school playgrounds and fields being empty because of the moratorium on team sports and have yet to re-adjust now that young kids and families are once again occupying those spaces.  So what’s the big deal?  Each year, there are 4.5 million dog bites with roughly 800,000 needing medical attention, and half of the victims are children.  Read on to brush up on Tennessee’s leash laws and what you can do to protect yourself and others. Continue reading

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March 7th through the 13th is the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) National Vehicle Safety Recall Week.  Since 1966, when NHTSA was given the authority, the agency has recalled almost 400 million cars, trucks, buses, RVs, motorcycles and mopeds.  In addition, the NHTSA has recalled more than 46 million tires, 66 million pieces of motor vehicle equipment, and 42 million car seats due to safety defects. Do you know how this federal agency decides a recall is warranted?  Do you know how the safety recalls work?  Do you know how to make sure you receive notice of a safety recall?

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In 2017, Michel Roccati was involved in a motorcycle accident.  His spinal cord was completely severed and he was rendered paraplegic.  Recently, doctors implanted an electrode in his spine and he is now able to walk again, and not just a few steps with lots of assistance, but a mile with a simple rolling walker.  This could be a game-changer for people who suffer paraplegic and quadriplegic injuries in car, motorcycle, truck and other types of accidents.  In the meantime, how could this change the lawsuits and recoveries arising from those accidents? Continue reading

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Traffic deaths continue to surge.  For the first nine months of 2021, 31,720 people lost their lives in car accidents.  For reference, Johnny “Red” Floyd Stadium at MTSU has a capacity of 30,778.  For that same time period in 2020, deaths from car accidents increased 12% – the biggest increase over a 9 month period since the National Traffic Highway Safety Administration (NHTSA) began keeping records in 1975.  In short, people are dying on our roads in record numbers.  So what is being done to reverse this trend and what can you do to protect yourself? Continue reading

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Earlier this week, on January 26, 1838, Tennessee was the first state in the nation to pass a Prohibition law.  The law made it a misdemeanor to sell alcoholic beverages.  Interestingly, the penalty for doing so was left completely to the discretion of the court.  Whatever fine the court did impose was to be used for the support of public schools.  Prohibition officially ended in 1933 but there are still plenty of laws related to the sale and consumption of alcohol in the State of Tennessee including laws creating liability for bars, restaurants and clubs that over-serve patrons who then get into accidents or otherwise harm others.  Read on for more on this type of prohibition. Continue reading

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