Pedestrian Deaths and Injuries Increasing, Nationwide and in Tennessee

Pedestrian deaths in traffic accidents nationally increased from 4109 in 2009 to 4432 in 2011, according to the United States Department of Transportation. 

Deaths to men numbered deaths to women (3086 versus 1345) and 19% of the deaths were a result of hit and run accidents.

In Tennessee, 1221 pedestrians (including skateboarders, people on roller skates, etc.) were injured or killed in traffic accidents in 2010.  Davidson County, Tennessee had 275 of those injuries and deaths.  There were 83 pedestrian deaths in Tennessee in 2011; the number actually dropped to 68 deaths in 2012.  Unfortunately, the 2013 death rate for Tennessee pedestrians in increasing.  As of the date of this blog post, 46 pedestrian deaths have occurred.  At this same time in 2012, only 35 deaths had occurred.

Analysts are unsure of the reason for the increase.  Is the increase related to people texting while walking?  Is it people texting while driving?  Is it an increase in the number of pedestrians because of efforts in cities around the nation to encourage people to walk in their neighborhoods, thus increasing the likelihood of an interaction between pedestrians and motor vehicles?

Regardless of the reason, the fact remains that in an impact between a pedestrian and a motor vehicle, the pedestrian loses.  Every time.  This is not to say that the the motorist who is involved in the accident does not suffer the effects of the accident, too – many motorists, particularly those who negligently caused the accident, also must live with the consequences of what has happened.  But a pedestrian hit by a vehicle will almost always receive some type of physical harm that can have life-changing (or even life-ending) consequences.

If you or a loved one was injured in a pedestrian accident, our lawyers would be happy to discuss your potential case with you.  There is no charge for an initial consultation and, if we are able to accept you as a client, we will do so on a contingent fee basis.